Make A Joyful Noise: Dandan i Panduretas!

 

 

A Guam Batik Gallery Holiday Tradition

The meaning of the Chamorro saying, dandan I panduretas, by Judy Flores

I never knew what Panduretas were until just recently – I just never thought to ask. This song was always sung on the last night of the Nubenan Ninio.

I knew that “Dandan I Panduretas” meant to make a joyful noise. “Panduretas”, it turns out, are pots and pans and other objects with which to beat on and make a joyful noise.

The Nubenan Ninio (nine days of prayer for the Baby Jesus) is always calculated to end on Christmas Eve, Christmas, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, or Three Kings (January 6).  So Christmas parties were spread out all over Inalahan village as various families celebrated on any of these days.

On the ending celebrations, a full party meal was usually served, with everyone in the extended family contributing food and helping to prepare it.  Hineksa’ Agaga’ (red rice), barbeque fish, chicken keleguin, fish kelaguin, amotsiyas (chopped chicken with herbs, wrapped in pumpkin leaf), tamales gisu (made with corn meal and bacon, wrapped in banana leaf), galai appan lemmai (breadfruit in coconut milk), titiyas mai’es (corn tortillas), gollai agun suni (chopped taro leaves in coconut milk, lemon and turmeric) and whatever produce and meats that came from the family lanchos.

Happy Holidays from the Guam Batik Gallery!

OKINAWA OCEANIC CULTURE MUSEUM

 

Mariana Islands map on the floor of the exhibit

 

Dr. Judy Flores’ review of the Okinawa Oceanic Culture Museum was published in the
Traditional Musics of Oceania e-newsletter.  She describes the impressive display of Oceanic material and history.

 

The impact of the deep blue floor was heightened when the image of water was projected on its surface, complete with occasional fish, dolphins, turtles and, lastly, a whale which swam towards a two-story high projection screen at the far end. Water lapping sounds completed the illusion. A short movie began on the projection screen, which first showed a pristine white beach on which two island children ran to their grandfather, sitting on the beach. The grandfather told a story to answer the children’s question, “Where did we come from?”

For the full text, see the following newsletter, pages 5-8, including photos (you will need the Adobe Reader program).

Click here for full text and photos, pages 5-8.

 

 

OKINAWA OCEANIC CULTURE MUSEUM

 

Mariana Islands map on the floor of the exhibit

 

Dr. Judy Flores’ review of the Okinawa Oceanic Culture Museum was published in the
Traditional Musics of Oceania e-newsletter.  She describes the impressive display of Oceanic material and history.

 

The impact of the deep blue floor was heightened when the image of water was projected on its surface, complete with occasional fish, dolphins, turtles and, lastly, a whale which swam towards a two-story high projection screen at the far end. Water lapping sounds completed the illusion. A short movie began on the projection screen, which first showed a pristine white beach on which two island children ran to their grandfather, sitting on the beach. The grandfather told a story to answer the children’s question, “Where did we come from?”

For the full text, see the following newsletter, pages 5-8, including photos.

Click here for full text and photos, pages 5-8.

 

 

2014 Batik Classes Announced

 

Felis Nabidat todo hamyu.  Merry Christmas to all!

Here are some fun days available to learn the art of batik painting in the coming year.

Enjoy instruction by artist, Judy Flores in her Tonggan batik studio outside of Inarajan village in southern Guam.  If you are in California, tentative dates for San Diego workshops are March 21 and September 22!  Stay tuned.

Click the link below to see dates on our Classes and Events page.  Below are photos of some of the attendees and their art from prior classes to entice you.

A Traditional Island Christmas

 

An event as part of the revitalization of Inalahan village, Guam.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – INALAHAN STREET DANCE DEC 22! Inalahan Village is the place to celebrate a traditional Island Christmas on Sunday, Dec. 22. Beginning with our fresh-baked breads on Sunday morning at 9am, Sunday Market activities til noon – then the Mayor’s Christmas Parade in the evening. While waiting for the parade to proceed from Malojloj, we will have a street dance on San Jose Avenue beginning at 6pm – complete with pizza sales from our hotnu. Christmas-lighted floats and Christmas-lighted houses along the route. Come join us and get into the Christmas spirit!

Felis Nabidat!

 

A float on San Jose Street, Inalahan

Ginen i Tano’

Introducing GINEN I TANO’, Sunday November 17th from 9am – 4pm.
Come down to historic Inalahan to experience Guam’s newest festival to support the revitalization of Inalahan and the old George Flores store which has become a cultural museum in the village.
Enjoy all good things GINEN I TANO’ (from the land) including local crafts, food and tours of the historic district.

Flying off to PIFA

 

 

In a few hours, Judy will be in the air on her journey to PIFA 2013.  We are getting good at this; got our booth setup all planned out and new Judy Flores glass ornaments ready to unveil along with our regular books and art and gift items.  In San Diego, these and the artist herself are available just twice a year – at PIFA and again at the Chamorro Cultural Fest in March.

And now that we’ve learned that Sunday is more of a kick-back day at PIFA, we have opened up a batik painting class at 10 am on the second day, Sunday, Sept. 22.  To be sure to get your spot, sign up at http://batikatpifa.eventbrite.com/

Whatever your desire, come and enjoy this beautiful bay front celebration of Pacific Culture.  Free entrance.  Free entertainment.  Great food available.  Unique art and gifts for that mahalang feeling.  You might even get a glimpse of the Sakman Chamorro in the bay.

Esta ki!

 

Winning art piece for the new Medical City hospital on Guam

 

 

In March of this year, a press conference announced the launch of the competition for the 30′ x 12′ art piece to grace the atrium of the Guam Regional Medical City currently being constructed on Guam.  It was well attended by artists and the community, and beautifully executed I might add by the local Galaide Group communications and marketing company.  In the following weeks, the artists applications were considered, and a group of 13 finalists were selected.  Finally, a winner was announced on July 30.

As the artists’ daughter and marketing person, I’m proud to announce that Judy Flores came away with the winning commission based on her scale model of her piece “Where patients are partners – for life”.   In about 12 months, the public will be able to see the three story tall batik installed in the new GRMC hospital.

Photo from the GRMC website.

The signature vivid silk piece took coordination, construction and budgeting skills beyond the requisite art expertise.  Providing a piece for this scale makes several panels necessary, and the know how to install these in an attractive and practical way.  Judy’s cooperation with other area artists and framers has been part of her success.  She was able to plug in the right people for assisting with this work.  Her expertise with program writing had to have helped in planning and budgeting the job.  A portion of the $70K winning commission will go to local services to build and install the art.

In the end, the GRMC contest was the genesis of so much beautiful art, that it was decided that each of the 13 finalists would get paid for their scale model pieces to be used in different parts of the hospital; truly a win-win for all involved.

Please see the photos from the Agana Shopping Center contest thanks to Tevin and Cynthia Flores.